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Parcheesi - The Game of Emperors. Read The Review and Play Online!

Parcheesi
Category: Games
Parcheesi

Review

Chess may be considered the game of kings, but Pachisi is the game of emperors. Parcheesi is a modern take on an ancient game developed in India, perhaps as early as 500AD, called Pachisi. Now it is one of the most popular board and strategy games in the world, and has a variety of names, depending on the location: Parchís, Parcheesi, Ludo, etc. It uses a particular layout for racing games called the “cross and circle” for obvious reasons, looking at the board

What Is It About?

The game and its variants are known worldwide. A similar game called Parchís is popular in Spain and northern Morocco. Parqués is its Colombian variant. A version is available in the United Kingdom under the name of Ludo. Parcheesi is typically played with two dice, four pawns per player and a board with a track around the outside, four corner spaces and four "home paths" leading to a central end space. The most popular Parcheesi boards in America have 68 spaces around the edge of the board, 12 of which are darkened "safe spaces" where a piece cannot be captured. The goal of the game is to move all of one's pawns "home" to the center space.

The gameplay is simple: each player has to enter four pieces and move them around the board counterclockwise to the home space. This anti-clockwise movement was used in some other Indian games but is considered unusual in modern track games. A roll of “5” is required to enter a piece. Landing on a space occupied by another player means the other player is “hit” or captured and has to return to start; twelve “safety” spots called castle squares keep you protected from capture. Two of your pieces on the same space form a blockade, preventing your opponent from passing. Games researcher Wayne Saunders (see his article elsewhere in this issue), who viewed videos showing Pachisi being played in India, noted how much more quickly the game was played than Parcheesi.

“What impressed me the most…was the speed with which everyone took his turn—while one player is making his moves, the next is already throwing the dice.” In some of the games and variants, you pass by your own starting space before heading home; in others, Parcheesi among them, you head home before reaching your entry space. More modern variations, such as Ludo, have fewer spaces, and some have no safety squares.

Is It Good?

This is a great family game that can either be kind or cruel, depending on who you play with. It plays quickly, you can complete a game in about a half hour and repeat games can be quiet different from each other, as who gets the best rolls at the beginning of the game can have a dramatic effect on how the entire game plays out later on.

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Parcheesi - The Game of Emperors. Read The Review and Play Online!

Chess may be considered the game of kings, but Pachisi is the game of emperors. Parcheesi is a modern take on an ancient game developed in India, perhaps as early as 500AD, called Pachisi. Now it is one of the most popular board and strategy games in the world, and has a variety of names, depending on the location: Parchís, Parcheesi, Ludo, etc. It uses a particular layout for racing games called the “cross and circle” for obvious reasons, looking at the board

What Is It About?

The game and its variants are known worldwide. A similar game called Parchís is popular in Spain and northern Morocco. Parqués is its Colombian variant. A version is available in the United Kingdom under the name of Ludo. Parcheesi is typically played with two dice, four pawns per player and a board with a track around the outside, four corner spaces and four "home paths" leading to a central end space. The most popular Parcheesi boards in America have 68 spaces around the edge of the board, 12 of which are darkened "safe spaces" where a piece cannot be captured. The goal of the game is to move all of one's pawns "home" to the center space.

The gameplay is simple: each player has to enter four pieces and move them around the board counterclockwise to the home space. This anti-clockwise movement was used in some other Indian games but is considered unusual in modern track games. A roll of “5” is required to enter a piece. Landing on a space occupied by another player means the other player is “hit” or captured and has to return to start; twelve “safety” spots called castle squares keep you protected from capture. Two of your pieces on the same space form a blockade, preventing your opponent from passing. Games researcher Wayne Saunders (see his article elsewhere in this issue), who viewed videos showing Pachisi being played in India, noted how much more quickly the game was played than Parcheesi.

“What impressed me the most…was the speed with which everyone took his turn—while one player is making his moves, the next is already throwing the dice.” In some of the games and variants, you pass by your own starting space before heading home; in others, Parcheesi among them, you head home before reaching your entry space. More modern variations, such as Ludo, have fewer spaces, and some have no safety squares.

Is It Good?

This is a great family game that can either be kind or cruel, depending on who you play with. It plays quickly, you can complete a game in about a half hour and repeat games can be quiet different from each other, as who gets the best rolls at the beginning of the game can have a dramatic effect on how the entire game plays out later on.

Graphics 10.00

Sound 10.00

Gameplay 10.00

Lasting Appeal 10.00

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